HARDHOUND

Little Orpheus and the Rogue Lyons, Pusdrainer, Fair Fjola (Auris Apothecary)

Author: Colin | Published: 21/5/11

Auris Apothecary

Auris Apothecary

Auris Apothecary

Auris Apothecary

Auris Apothecary

Auris Apothecary

Auris Apothecary

Auris Apothecary

Auris Apothecary

Auris Apothecary

Auris Apothecary

Auris Apothecary

Artist 1-5: Little Orpheus and the Rogue Lyons; 6-9: Pusdrainer; 10-12: Fair Fjola
Title 1-5: Little Orpheus and the Rogue Lyons; 6-9: Worms Beneath Thy Cold Flesh; 10-12: Fair Fjola
Label Auris Apothecary
Year 2009-11
Design Auris Apothecary
Music Drone, electronic, avant-garde, lo-fi, metal, punk and other varying forms of underground art
Desktop Download image
Notes I dare anyone to argue with the delight of Auris Apothecary’s releases. Take Little Orpheus and the Rogue Lyons for example: who else takes the care to wrap their cassette release in a warped and paint splattered 7″ single? Or who releases an ‘infinite loop on vintage Norwegian chrome tape containing 20+ year old data recordings from oceanographic instruments’? I can still smell the dead earth smell emanating from Pusdrainer’s metal container which contents incidentally can be played back on any typical 4-track cassette recorder – that’s if the earth doesn’t screw the machine up first. Good luck with that.

Auris Apothecary produce small treasures made with care and imagination, each release is a delight.

Here’s what the label has to say:

Auris Apothecary is a not-for-profit micro-label hailing from Bloomington, IN which embraces obscure formats, innovative packaging and do-it-yourself ethics. We exist because fuck you.

We release drone, electronic, avant-garde, lo-fi, metal, punk and other varying forms of underground art from friends and family alongside artists located throughout the world.

With a general wrench-in-the-gears mentality to the modern commercial music industry, Auris Apothecary strives to create new forms of musical and sensory experiences through bizarre alterations of audio/video mediums and packaging that pushes the envelope of creativity.

All releases are strictly limited editions, distributed in Bloomington, IN record stores and online at the Phar

Listen Visit the Auris Apothecary website to hear samples and full downloads of out of print releases.

Comments

  1. it’s quite interesting how today’s music is much more about the object than the actual sound; products like these degrade the cultural value of music as an experience; i wonder how many people actually buy this to listen to the music

    Comment by oneyedummy — June 18, 2011 @ 3:11 pm
  2. Hello oneeyedummy, I don’t agree. The CDs and cassettes are eminently playable. When so many releases are mass produced and blandly forgettable, it’s great to see such wonderful, imaginative objects.

    Comment by Colin — June 18, 2011 @ 6:45 pm
  3. “objects” – well, this is the problem – you’re talking about objects, not about music, and my initial question stays “how many people actually buy this to listen to the music?” and I would like to add another one – “how many of these objects are conceptually connected to the music and help the listener to understand it better?”

    Comment by oneyedummy — August 9, 2011 @ 4:50 pm
  4. I have no idea how many people buy Auris Apothecary’s releases. You’d have to ask them. Does it matter? Does something have to be popular or sell x numbers to be interesting or important? Don’t you ever do anything for the love of it? This whole strange website doesn’t sell anything, each month costs hosting and time, here I am still doing it more than four years later. I love the enthusiasm and oddness and playfulness that has resulted in the images here. They’re handmade, imaginative, unusual objects, but they’re not going to hit the charts. That’s not their intention.

    As to their conceptual connection, you’d have to listen to each one and think about that yourself on a case by case basis. Perhaps some may strike you as less or more connected, but take Pusdrainer’s Worms Beneath Thy Cold Flesh: its tin container is full of earth and illustrated with bones and worms. Listen to the music on the label’s webpage. To these ears it sounds full of dread and darkness and therefore highly connected to its imagery. Your take may vary.

    Comment by Colin — August 14, 2011 @ 10:21 am
  5. Reminds me a lot of the old zoviet*france stuff — nice.

    Comment by G — October 17, 2011 @ 1:34 pm
  6. today’s popular music is about marketing, consumption, retro-kitsch, co-opting, digitization, plagiarism, and pirating; maybe it was always like that. artists and labels that take time and effort to put some soul into the packaging of their work is a sublime thing, and to create an objet d’art to go along with their music, well, it doesn’t get any better than that. the cultural value of music was degraded by the industry itself, not the artist making their music. art/music objects to supplement music only enhance music, it never takes away from it. it is irrelevant if it goes with the ‘music’ or not, it is just another aspect.

    Comment by scott — September 13, 2014 @ 1:46 pm

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