HARDHOUND

Miles Davis – Quintet 1965-68

Author: Colin | Published: 25/11/12

Miles Davis - Quintet 1965-68

Miles Davis - Quintet 1965-68

Miles Davis - Quintet 1965-68

Miles Davis - Quintet 1965-68

Miles Davis - Quintet 1965-68

Miles Davis - Quintet 1965-68

Miles Davis - Quintet 1965-68

Miles Davis - Quintet 1965-68

Miles Davis - Quintet 1965-68

Miles Davis - Quintet 1965-68

Artist Miles Davis
Title Quintet 1968-68
Label Columbia
Year 1998
Design Art direction: Arnold Levine and Janet Boye
Music Jazz
Notes Do you ever compile lists in your head of your all time top 10s, desert island disc-style? If you’re a fan of this site, I’d say there’s a chance you do :-) Well, one of my perennial rhetorical questions is – if I could only take one Miles Davis box which would it be? It’s a real struggle between this one, the Coltrane/Miles one, the On The Corner or the Jack Johnson ones. The Bitches Brew box has even entered the fray lately as I’ve opened up to the incredible longform pieces it contains like Orange Lady, Great Expectations, Yaphet, Lonely Fire and the others. At the moment though, with a gun to my head (yes, these rhetorical questions are serious…) I’m leaning towards Miles’ Second Great Quintet. I won’t attempt to add to the superlatives heaped on this group… okay I can’t resist – the music here is utterly breathtaking in its angular modernity, incredible sense of space and interplay, sheer poetics, dark grace and deep, deep blues. This is the very top of the mountain.

I love how this box reveals the group’s incredible development from its debut, E.S.P., through to the first side of Filles De Kilimanjaro in a mere handful of years. I’m not often a fan of alternate and aborted takes, but every last moment of these five artists is essential.

Design-wise this takes its lead from its predecessor, Seven Steps though it doesn’t push the boat out quite as far. The linen cover, the metallic spine and the black and white composite image are lovely. I’m not quite so sure about the treatment of the CD sleeves, but I feel privileged to own and know this music. Thank you Miles.

6 CDs, 7 hours, 21 minutes and 17 seconds.

Also - Miles Davis – Seven Steps: The Complete Columbia Recordings of Miles Davis 1963-64
- Miles Davis and Gil Evans – The Complete Columbia Studio Recordings
- Miles Davis and John Coltrane – The Complete Columbia Recordings 1955-1961
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Eleh – Floating Frequences/Intuitive Synthesis

Author: Colin | Published: 17/11/12
Previous Sigur Rós ‎– Með Suð Í Eyrum Við Spilum Endalaust Next Miles Davis – Quintet 1965-68

Eleh

Eleh

Eleh

Eleh

Eleh

Eleh

Artist Eleh
Title Floating Frequences/Intuitive Synthesis
Label Important Records
Year 2011
Design Unspecified
Music Waveform minimalism
Notes Design perfectly suited to the music on this CD compilation of previous 12″s. The original vinyl releases are lovely, but I’m afraid I couldn’t justify the expensive so don’t own any of them.

Eleh

Eleh

See also: Raster Noton
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Sigur Rós ‎– Með Suð Í Eyrum Við Spilum Endalaust

Author: Colin | Published: 3/11/12
Previous Richard Skelton – Verse of Birds Next Eleh – Floating Frequences/Intuitive Synthesis

Sigur Ros

Sigur Ros

Sigur Ros

Sigur Ros

Sigur Ros

Sigur Ros

Sigur Ros

Sigur Ros

Sigur Ros

Sigur Ros

Sigur Ros

Sigur Ros

Artist Sigur Rós
Title Með Suð Í Eyrum Við Spilum Endalaust
Label EMI
Year 2008
Design All tour photography by Eva Vermandel; still life photography by Joss McKinley; design by Sarah Hopper
Music Sigur Rós
Notes In an idle moment did you ever wonder to yourself what ‘Með Suð Í Eyrum Við Spilum Endalaust’ means? ‘With a buzz in our ears we play endlessly’ – which, like so many of their lyrics, is rather lovely. My ears only opened fairly recently to Sigur Rós, it’s lovely when they do though. Now I have tickets to see them in March next year in Glasgow with my children. Can’t wait.

This is obviously the limited edition version: ‘an individually numbered 200-page fine weave cloth-bound hardback book’… The pictures are a mixture of shots of the group and their travels. They’re compositionally interesting and avoid being indulgently hagiographic. The cover is a gorgeous shade of pale blue with the title delightfully rendered in embossed handwriting. The four bookmark ribbons, each in a different colour are a lovely detail, an echo of the cables in the first image in the book. Like their music, the book is something to treasure. There are still copies available on the band’s website.

I’ve featured the group once before on Hard Format: ()

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